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The Union Oil Fire

The fire scene is the aftermath of the Union Oil Fire in which David Campbell was killed.

On June 26, 1911, an alarm came in from E. Salmon and Water Street shortly after 7:45 a.m. An oil pump at the Union Oil distributing plant had thrown a spark, igniting gas accumulated in its motor pit. As he got into his automobile, Chief Campbell knew the fire would be hot. One of the first at the scene, he began directing arriving engine companies. By 8:30, every fire company in the city was on the line, an incredible jumble of men, machines and horses, slipping in inches of water as they tried to position themselves.

Realizing that the fire was out of control and their only hope for controlling it would come with an interior attack, Campbell borrowed a turnout coat from one of his men and disappeared into the building. At 8:39, there was an ominous rumble from the basement as accumulated gases approached their flashpoint. Bodies were hurtled across the street, tank heads flew 200 ft. in the air, the north wall was tossed across the street and the roof fell back to the ground. Campbell was last seen silhouetted against the flames, holding up his arms to brace against the falling roof.

By 10:15 a.m. when the fire was brought under control, word had passed from engine company to engine company that Chief Campbell had gone into the building before the explosion and had not come out. Rescue efforts began, and his body was found huddled in his borrowed turnout coat with the letters “F.D.” still visible on the buttons.

A Profound Loss for Portland
The passing of David Campbell signaled the end of an era. Campbell had successfully straddled the cusp between the old and the new in terms of manpower organization and technology.

After Campbell’s untimely death at the age of 47, the public came out in droves to mourn the hero they fondly knew as “Our Dave”. Over 150,000 citizens crowded into downtown Portland streets for Campbell’s funeral, which to this day is the largest number of people that have ever gathered for a similar occasion in Portland’s history.

The funeral procession for Chief David Campbell. 150,000 lined the streets of Portland and it is considered the largest funeral procession in Portland's history.

Honoring Sacrifice in the Line of Duty
Portland firefighters continue to honor bravery and sacrifice in the line of duty with the Campbell Memorial Ceremony, which takes place the third week in June every year.

 

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All donors will be provided with an acknowledgment of their tax-deductible contribution for their tax records.

History of David Campbell

Learn more about beloved Fire Chief David Campbell, who made the ultimate sacrifice protecting the citizens of Portland on June 26, 1911. Read more...

The Union Oil Fire

On June 26, 1911, an alarm came in from E. Salmon and Water Street shortly after 7:45 a.m. An oil pump at the Union Oil distributing plant had thrown a spark, igniting gas accumulated in its motor pit.
Read more...